FEATURED

Science Live: Whalebirds Mystery 

When:
22 Oct 2013,  1.50pm–2.50pm
Where:
Online and Wellington Foyer, Level 2
Cost:
Free
Type:
Talk; Special 

Te Papa scientist Sarah Jamieson measures whalebirds from the 2011 wreck, February 2013. Photograph by Lara Shepherd, Te Papa
Te Papa scientist Sarah Jamieson measures whalebirds from the 2011 wreck, February 2013. Photograph by Lara Shepherd, Te Papa

Join Te Papa scientists online as they examine the mystery of over 300,000 storm-wrecked whalebirds (prions).

Find out what goes on behind the scenes in Te Papa's science lab! Watch live on YouTube and ask questions through Twitter.

Over 300,000 whalebirds (prions) died as a consequence of a huge storm over New Zealand in July 2011. Scientists at Te Papa are doing some detective work to find out what impact this devastating natural disaster will have on prion populations in New Zealand waters – and beyond.

We’ll be collecting scientific data to uncover more about these little-studied birds. Were the whalebirds that died mostly male or female? Juvenile or mature? How do scientists study birds that look identical? Watch as we dissect the birds and take samples for analysis.

Adult broad-billed prions on Kundy Island, March 2011. Photograph by Colin Miskelly, Te Papa
Adult broad-billed prions on Kundy Island, March 2011. Photograph by Colin Miskelly, Te Papa

Follow the action live on YouTube.

You can also watch the event live in Wellington Foyer, Level 2 where our staff will be on hand to direct your questions to the scientists.

Ask questions on Twitter using the hashtag #ScienceLiveTePapa

Follow our live blogs, posts on Facebook, and Twitter updates throughout the day.

See Te Papa’s Science Live blogs for more information.

Te Papa on YouTube
Te Papa on Facebook
Te Papa on Twitter