The Genetic Revolution

The Genetic Revolution 

When:
Exhibition now closed
03 September 2005 – 23 January 2006
Where:
Cost:
Type:
Nature; Family 

 

Designer babies! Gene therapy! GE food! There’s a scientific revolution going on – and you’re in the middle of it! Genetic research such as the deciphering of the human genome is part of a wave of discovery that is changing the way we think about ourselves and our place in the natural world.

Does genetic science allow us to take control of our destiny? Or put at risk our relationship with nature? People’s genetic knowledge and capabilities are increasing all the time. But what are the limits and who should set them? Who keeps a check on all these activities?

The Genetic Revolution offers you an opportunity to immerse yourself in these extraordinary developments and possibilities – and the dilemmas and debates arising from them. Through graphics, hands-on models, audio-visual presentations, and computer animations and interactives, the exhibition offers clear information on the science and diverse points of view on the social and ethical issues. Polling stations give you the chance to express your own views.

Explore what people have found out about themselves through the Human Genome Project. Join the debate on the challenges to New Zealand’s ‘clean and green’ image and the relationship between genetic science and Māori customary concepts. Discover some of the amazing possibilities for dealing with genetically related diseases and disorders. But what about embryos being selected for genetic traits? Or altering people’s genetic make-up? Take a closer look at the implications and check out your comfort zone on the issues.

Try your hand at DNA extraction in the Learning Lab. See how genes work – and get the inside story on colour blindness. Find out about cloning endangered animal species and some surprising discoveries about the origins of New Zealand plants and animals.

The Genetic Revolution was developed by the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

 

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